We Keep You Up to Date

Visit our News page for regular updates on tax regulation and the latest developments at our firm.

Anyone who's worked in an office at some point or another has had to go to accounting. They're the people who pay and send out the bills that keep the business running.

They do a lot more than that, though. Sometimes referred to as "bean counters" they also keep their eye on profits, costs and losses.

Unless you're running your own business and acting as your own bookkeeper, you'd have no way of knowing just how profitable - or not - your business is without some form of accounting.

No matter what business you're in, even if all you do is balance a checkbook, that's still accounting. It's part of even a kid's life. Saving an allowance, spending it all at once - these are
accounting principles.

What are some other businesses where accounting is critical? Well, farmers need to follow careful accounting procedures. Many of them run their farms year to year by taking loans to plant the crops. If it's a good year, a profitable one, then they can pay off their loan; if not, they might have to carry the loan over, and accrue more interest charges.

Every business and every individual needs to have some kind of accounting system in their lives. Otherwise, the finances can get away from them, they don't know what they've spent, or whether they can expect a profit or a loss from their business.

Staying on top of accounting, whether it's for a multi-billion dollar business or for a personal checking account is a necessary activity on a daily basis if you're smart. Not doing so can mean
anything from a bounced check or posting a loss to a company's shareholders. Both scenarios can be equally devastating.


Accounting is basically information, and this information is published periodically in business as a profit and loss statement, or an income statement.


To Your Business Growth & Success
Mark P. Martin
www.mpmartin.com

New Tax Laws for 2009

 

We keep you informed of the most important changes:

 

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, signed into law on Feb. 17, 2009 allows qualifying small business to choose a net operating loss (NOL) carryback period for certain losses of three to five years, instead of the usual two-year period. Selecting the right carryback period ensures tax benefits for the business, taking into account the carryback itself and its tax picture for the current and previous years.

Disclosure and Use of Taxpayer Information – New IRS regulations provide taxpayers with greater control over their personal tax return information. The Internal Revenue Code, Section 7216, Disclosure or Use of Tax Information by Preparers of Returns, became effective January 1, 2009. These regulations limit tax return preparers' use and disclosure of information obtained during the return preparation process.

Anti-abuse rules – Act Sec. 1211(c) gives IRS the authority to issue rules which are necessary to prevent the abuse of the purposes of Act Sec. 1211, including anti-stuffing rules, anti-churning rules (including rules relating to sale-leasebacks), and rules similar to the regulations under Code Sec. 1091 relating to losses from wash sales.

 

Please schedule an appointment to learn more about important changes in tax law.

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Call us at (720) 221-4256 with any questions or to schedule an appointment.

 

MP Martin Accounting and Data Services

 

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